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A New Study from the Mayo Clinic

Texting produces a unique new brainwave pattern.

A research team from the Mayo Clinic has shown that text messaging changes the rhythm of brain wave patterns in a way that’s never seen before. The discovery shows that smartphones are literally altering the way our minds work.

We’re texting more than ever, yet little is known about the neurological effects of smartphone use. A new study shows that textural communication elicits a unique waveform, or “texting rhythm,” in the brains of some individuals. It’s a fascinating finding, one that shows how incredibly adaptable our brains really are, and how our cognitive processes change when confronted with new and mentally challenging technologies.

Now, sending texts on your smartphone may not sound like a particularly challenging task, but there’s a lot going on when you’re putting together a message. In addition to formulating a succinct, nonverbal message (not to mention choosing that critically important emoji), smartphone users need to be able to hold the device, apply fine finger dexterity while typing, and focus their eyes on a relatively small screen. Together, all these tasks are tapping into various compartments of the interconnected brain, and together they’re producing the new texting rhythm.

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